O-S

+

FAVOURITE QUOTES

MARK HAYSOM is the author of the critically acclaimed ‘Love, Love Me Do’ and ‘Imagine’. From time to time, he publishes favourite quotes from great writers, leaders and thinkers.

+

O

George Orwell

George Orwell

‘War is peace. Freedom is slavery. Ignorance is strength’

‘Freedom is the right to tell people what they do not want to hear’

‘In a time of universal deceit – telling the truth is a revolutionary act’

Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 – 21 January 1950), who used the pen name George Orwell, was an English novelist, essayist, journalist and critic. Commonly ranked as one of the most influential English writers of the 20th century, and as one of the most important chroniclers of English culture of his generation, Orwell wrote literary criticism, poetry, fiction, and polemical journalism. He is best known for the dystopian novel Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949) and the allegorical novella Animal Farm (1945). His book Homage to Catalonia (1938), an account of his experiences in the Spanish Civil War, is widely acclaimed, as are his numerous essays on politics, literature, language, and culture. In 2008, The Times ranked him second on a list of “The 50 greatest British writers since 1945”. (Source: Wikipedia)

+

Ovid

Ovid

‘Endure and persist; this pain will turn to good by and by’

Publius Ovidius Naso (20 March 43 BC – AD 17/18), known as Ovid in the English-speaking world, was a Roman poet, living during the reign of Augustus, and a contemporary of Virgil and Horace. He is best known for the Metamorphoses, a 15-book continuous mythological narrative. (Source: Wikipedia)

 

P

Thomas Paine

Thomas Paine

‘The real man smiles in trouble, gathers strength from distress, and grows brave by reflection’

‘We have it in our power to begin the world over again’

Thomas Paine (February 9, 1737 – June 8, 1809) was an English and American political activist, philosopher, political theorist and revolutionary. As the author of the two most influential pamphlets at the start of the American Revolution, he inspired the rebels in 1776 to declare independence from Britain. His ideas reflected Enlightenment-era rhetoric of transnational human rights. He has been called “a corsetmaker by trade, a journalist by profession, and a propagandist by inclination”.

+

Dorothy Parker

Dorothy Parker

‘It’s not the tragedies that kill us, it’s the messes’

‘If you want to know what God thinks of money, just look at the people he gave it to’

‘The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity’

Dorothy Parker (August 22, 1893 – June 7, 1967) was an American poet, short story writer, critic and satirist, best known for her wit, wisecracks, and eye for 20th-century urban foibles. (Source: Wikipedia)

+

Pablo Picasso

Picasso

‘Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up.

Pablo Ruiz y Picasso, also known as Pablo Picasso (25 October 1881 – 8 April 1973), was a Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, stage designer, poet and playwright who spent most of his adult life in France. As one of the greatest and most influential artists of the 20th century, he is known for co-founding the Cubist movement, the invention of constructed sculpture, the co-invention of collage, and for the wide variety of styles that he helped develop and explore. (Source: Wikipedia)

+

Sylvia Plath

Sylvia Plath

‘Imagination is more important than knowledge’

Sylvia Plath ( October 27, 1932 – February 11, 1963) was an American poet, novelist, and short-story writer. Born in Boston, Massachusetts, she studied at Smith College and Newnham College at the University of Cambridge, before receiving acclaim as a poet and writer. She married fellow poet Ted Hughes in 1956; they lived together in the United States and then England, and had two children, Frieda and Nicholas. Plath suffered from depression for much of her adult life, and in 1963 she committed suicide.(Source: Wikipedia)

+

Plato

Plato

‘One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors’

‘There are two things a person should never be angry at, what they can help, and what they cannot.’

Plato (428/427 or 424/423 – 348/347 BCE) was a philosopher, as well as mathematician, in Classical Greece. He is considered an essential figure in the development of philosophy, especially the Western tradition, and he founded the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world. Along with his teacher Socrates and his most famous student, Aristotle, Plato laid the foundations of Western philosophy and science. (Source: Wikipedia)

+

Marcel Proust

Marcel Proust

‘The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes’

Valentin Louis Georges Eugène Marcel Proust (10 July 1871 – 18 November 1922) was a French novelist, critic, and essayist best known for his monumental novel À la recherche du temps perdu (In Search of Lost Time; earlier translated as Remembrance of Things Past), published in seven parts between 1913 and 1927. He is considered by many to be one of the greatest authors of all time. (Source: Wikipedia)

 

Q

 

R

Rainer Maria Rilke

Rilke

‘Love consists in this, that two solitudes protect and touch and greet each other’

René Karl Wilhelm Johann Josef Maria Rilke (4 December 1875 – 29 December 1926) — better known as Rainer Maria Rilke — was a Bohemian-Austrian poet and novelist, “widely recognized as one of the most lyrically intense German-language poets”, writing in both verse and highly lyrical prose. (Source: Wikipedia)

+

Theodore Roethke

Theodore Roethke

‘What we need is more people who specialize in the impossible’

Theodore Huebner Roethke (May 25, 1908 – August 1, 1963) was an American poet. He published several volumes of award-winning and critically acclaimed poetry. Roethke is regarded as one of the most accomplished and influential poets of his generation. Roethke’s work is characterized by its introspection, rhythm and natural imagery. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1954 for his book, The Waking. (Source: Wikipedia)

+

Franklin D. Roosevelt

FDR

‘We must remember that any oppression, any injustice, any hatred, is a wedge designed to attack our civilization’

‘Happiness lies not in the mere possession of money. It lies in the joy of achievement, in the thrill of creative effort’

‘Men are not prisoners of fate, but only prisoners of their own minds’

Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), commonly known by his initials FDR, was an American statesman and political leader who served as the 32nd President of the United States. A Democrat, he won a record four elections and served from March 1933 to his death in April 1945. He was a central figure in world events during the mid-20th century, leading the United States during a time of worldwide economic depression and war. (Source: Wikipedia)

+

Arundhati Roy

Arundhati Roy

‘That’s what careless words do. They make people love you a little less’

Suzanna Arundhati Roy (born 24 November 1961) is an Indian author and political activist who is best known for the 1998 Man Booker Prize for Fiction-winning novel The God of Small Things (1997) and for her involvement in human rights and environmental causes. Roy’s novel became the biggest-selling book by a nonexpatriate Indian author. (Source: Wikipedia)

+

Bertrand Russell

Russell

‘I think we ought always to entertain our opinions with some measure of doubt. I shouldn’t wish people dogmatically to believe any philosophy, not even mine.’

‘To conquer fear is the beginning of wisdom’

‘The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts’

Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 3rd Earl Russell, (18 May 1872 – 2 February 1970) was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, historian, writer, social critic and political activist. At various points in his life he considered himself a liberal, a socialist, and a pacifist. (Source: Wikipedia)

 

 

S

Antoine de Saint-Exupery

Saint-Exupery

‘When you give yourself, you receive more than you give’

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, officially Antoine Marie Jean-Baptiste Roger, comte de Saint Exupéry (29 June 1900 – 31 July 1944) was a French aristocrat, writer, poet, and pioneering aviator. He became a laureate of several of France’s highest literary awards and also won the U.S. National Book Award. He is best remembered for his novella The Little Prince and for his lyrical aviation writings, including Wind, Sand and Stars and Night Flight. (Source: Wikipedia)

+

George Sand

George Sand

‘It is a mistake to regard age as a downhill grade toward dissolution. The reverse is true. As one grows older, one climbs with surprising strides.’

‘There is only one happiness in this life, to love and be loved’

Amantine-Lucile-Aurore Dupin (1 July 1804 – 8 June 1876), best known by her pseudonym George Sand, was a French novelist and memoirist. She is equally well known for her much publicized romantic affairs with a number of artists, including the composer and pianist Frédéric Chopin and the writer Alfred de Musset. (Source: Wikipedia)

+

Albert Schweitzer

Albert Schweitzer

‘Happiness is nothing more than good health and a bad memory’

Albert Schweitzer, OM (14 January 1875 – 4 September 1965) was a German—and later French—theologian, organist, philosopher, physician, and medical missionary in Africa, also known for his historical work on Jesus. He was born in the province of Alsace-Lorraine, at that time part of the German Empire, considered himself French and wrote mostly in French. Schweitzer, a Lutheran, challenged both the secular view of Jesus as depicted by historical-critical methodology current at this time in certain academic circles, as well as the traditional Christian view. He received the 1952 Nobel Peace Prize. (Source: Wikipedia)

+

Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Seneca

‘The greatest remedy for anger is delay’

‘One of the most beautiful qualities of true friendship is to understand and to be understood’

Lucius Annaeus Seneca (often known as Seneca the Younger or simply Seneca c. 4 BC – AD 65) was a Roman Stoic philosopher, statesman, dramatist, and in one work humorist, of the Silver Age of Latin literature. He was a tutor and later advisor to emperor Nero. While he was forced to commit suicide for alleged complicity in the Pisonian conspiracy to assassinate Nero, he may have been innocent. (Source: Wikipedia)

+

William Shakespeare

Shakespeare

‘Conversation should be pleasant without scurrility, witty without affectation, free without indecency, learned without conceitedness, novel without falsehood’

William Shakespeare (1564– 23 April 1616) was an English poet, playwright, and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world’s pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England’s national poet and the “Bard of Avon”. His extant works, including some collaborations, consist of around 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses, of which the authorship of some is uncertain. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.(Source: Wikipedia)

+

George Bernard Shaw

George Bernard Shaw

‘Democracy is a device that ensures we shall be governed no better than we deserve’

‘Youth is wasted on the young’

‘Success does not consist in never making mistakes but in never making the same one a second time’

‘Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance’

George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856 – 2 November 1950) was an Irish playwright and a co-founder of the London School of Economics. Although his first profitable writing was music and literary criticism, in which capacity he wrote many highly articulate pieces of journalism, his main talent was for drama, and he wrote more than 60 plays. He was also an essayist, novelist and short story writer. Nearly all his writings address prevailing social problems with a vein of comedy which makes their stark themes more palatable. Issues which engaged Shaw’s attention included education, marriage, religion, government, health care, and class privilege. He was most angered by what he perceived as the exploitation of the working class. An ardent socialist, Shaw wrote many brochures and speeches for the Fabian Society. He is the only person to have been awarded both a Nobel Prize in Literature (1925) and an Academy Award (1938), for his contributions to literature and for his work on the film Pygmalion (an adaptation of his play of the same name), respectively. (Source: Wikipedia)

+

C P Snow

C__P__Snow

‘When you think of the long and gloomy history of man, you will find more hideous crimes have been committed in the name of obedience than have ever been committed in the name of rebellion.’

Charles Percy Snow, Baron Snow, (15 October 1905 – 1 July 1980), was an English physical chemist and novelist who also served in several important positions in the British Civil Service and briefly in the UK government. He is best known for his series of novels known collectively as Strangers and Brothers, and for The Two Cultures, a 1959 lecture in which he laments the gulf between scientists and “literary intellectuals”. (Source: Wikipedia)

+

Socrates

Socrates

‘Remember that there is nothing stable in human affairs; therefore avoid undue elation in prosperity, or undue depression in adversity.’

‘Beware the barrenness of a busy life’

‘The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing’

Socrates (470/469 – 399 BC) was a classical Greek (Athenian) philosopher credited as one of the founders of Western philosophy. He is an enigmatic figure known chiefly through the accounts of classical writers, especially the writings of his students Plato and Xenophon and the plays of his contemporary Aristophanes. Plato’s dialogues are among the most comprehensive accounts of Socrates to survive from antiquity, though it is unclear the degree to which Socrates himself is “hidden behind his ‘best disciple’, Plato”. (Source: Wikipedia)

+

Sophocles

Sophocles

‘One word frees us of all the weight and pain of life. That word is love’

Sophocles (c.497/6 – winter 406/5 BC) is one of three ancient Greek tragedians whose plays have survived. His first plays were written later than those of Aeschylus, and earlier than or contemporary with those of Euripides. According to the Suda, a 10th-century encyclopaedia, Sophocles wrote 123 plays during the course of his life, but only seven have survived in a complete form. (Source: Wikipedia)

+

John Steinbeck

John Steinbeck

‘No one wants advice – only corroboration’

‘It is a common experience that a problem difficult at night is resolved in the morning after the committee of sleep has worked on it’

‘I wonder how many people I’ve looked at all my life and never seen’

John Ernst Steinbeck, Jr. (February 26, 1902 – December 20, 1968) was an American author of twenty-seven books, including sixteen novels, six non-fiction books, and five collections of short stories. He is widely known for the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Grapes of Wrath (1939), East of Eden (1952) and the novella Of Mice and Men (1937). (Source: Wikipedia)

+

Laurence Sterne

Laurence Sterne

‘In solitude the mind gains strength and learns to lean upon itself’

‘I take a simple view of life. It is keep your eyes open and get on with it’

Laurence Sterne (24 November 1713 – 18 March 1768) was an Anglo-Irish novelist and an Anglican clergyman. He is best known for his novels The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman and A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy; but he also published many sermons, wrote memoirs, and was involved in local politics. Sterne died in London after years of fighting consumption. (Source: Wikipedia)

+

Robert Louis Stevenson

Robert Louis Stevenson

‘Don’t judge each day by the harvest you reap but by the seeds that you plant’

Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson (13 November 1850 – 3 December 1894) was a Scottish novelist, poet, essayist, and travel writer. His most famous works are Treasure Island, Kidnapped, and Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. A literary celebrity during his lifetime, Stevenson now ranks among the 26 most translated authors in the world. (Source: Wikipedia)

+

Tom Stoppard

Tom Stoppard

‘I think age is a very high price to pay for maturity’

Sir Tom Stoppard OM CBE FRSL (born Tomáš Straussler; 3 July 1937) is a British playwright, knighted in 1997. He has written prolifically for TV, radio, film and stage, finding prominence with plays such as Arcadia, The Coast of Utopia, Every Good Boy Deserves Favour, Professional Foul, The Real Thing, and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead. Born in Czechoslovakia, Stoppard left as a child refugee, fleeing imminent Nazi occupation. He settled with his family in Britain after the war, in 1946. After being educated at schools in Nottingham and Yorkshire, Stoppard became a journalist, a drama critic and then, in 1960, a playwright. (Source: Wikipedia)

+

Harriet Beecher Stowe

Harriet Beecher Stowe

‘Never give up, for that is just the place and time that the tide will turn’

Harriet Elisabeth Beecher Stowe (June 14, 1811 – July 1, 1896) was an American abolitionist and author. Her novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852) was a depiction of life for African Americans under slavery; it reached millions as a novel and play, and became influential in the United States and United Kingdom. It energized anti-slavery forces in the American North, while provoking widespread anger in the South. She wrote more than 20 books, including novels, three travel memoirs, and collections of articles and letters. (Source: Wikipedia)

 

3,928 people have ‘Liked’ the author, MARK HAYSOM, on Facebook
No comments yet.

Leave a Reply