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FAVOURITE QUOTES

MARK HAYSOM is the author of the critically acclaimed ‘Love, Love Me Do’ and ‘Imagine’. From time to time, he publishes favourite quotes from great writers, leaders and thinkers.

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Charles Lamb

Charles Lamb

‘The privilege of friendship: to talk nonsense, and to have that nonsense respected’

Charles Lamb (10 February 1775 – 27 December 1834) was an English writer and essayist, best known for his Essays of Elia and for the children’s book Tales from Shakespeare, which he produced with his sister, Mary Lamb (1764–1847). He also wrote a number of poems, and was part of a literary circle in England, along with Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth, whom he befriended. He has been referred to by E. V. Lucas, his principal biographer, as “the most lovable figure in English literature”. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Lao-Tzu

Lao Tzu

‘Mastering others is strength. Mastering yourself is true power.’

‘When you are content to be simply yourself and don’t compare or compete, everybody will respect you’

‘Being deeply loved by someone gives you strength, while loving someone deeply gives you courage’

‘Silence is a source of great strength’

‘If you do not change direction, you may end up where you are heading’

‘To the mind that is still, the whole universe surrenders’

‘I have just three things to teach: simplicity, patience, compassion. These three are your greatest treasures.’

‘When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be’

‘Knowing others is wisdom, knowing yourself is enlightenment’

‘The truth is not always beautiful, nor beautiful words the truth’

Laozi (also Lao-Tzu) was a philosopher and poet of ancient China. He is best known as the reputed author of theTao Te Ching and the founder of philosophical Taoism, but he is also revered as a deity in religious Taoism and traditional Chinese religions. Although a legendary figure, he is usually dated to around the 6th century BC and reckoned a contemporary of Confucius, but some historians contend that he actually lived during the Warring States period of the 5th or 4th century BC. A central figure in Chinese culture, Laozi is claimed by both the emperors of the Tang dynasty and modern people of the Li surname as a founder of their lineage. Throughout history, Laozi’s work has been embraced by various anti-authoritarian movements. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Harper Lee

Harper Lee

‘People generally see what they look for, and hear what they listen for’

Nelle Harper Lee (born April 28, 1926) is an American novelist known for her 1960 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel To Kill a Mockingbird, which deals with the issues of racism that she observed as a child in her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama. Despite being Lee’s only published book, it led to her being awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom for her contribution to literature. Lee has received numerous honorary degrees but has always declined to make a speech. (Source: Wikipedia)

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C. S. Lewis

C S Lewis

‘You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream’

Clive Staples Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly called C. S. Lewis and known to his friends and family as “Jack”, was a novelist, poet, academic, medievalist, literary critic, essayist, lay theologian, and Christian apologist. Born in Belfast, Ireland, he held academic positions at both Oxford University (Magdalen College), 1925–54, and Cambridge University (Magdalene College), 1954–63. He is best known both for his fictional work, especially The Screwtape Letters, The Chronicles of Narnia, and The Space Trilogy. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Abraham Lincoln

Lincoln

‘Character is like a tree and reputation like its shadow. The shadow is what we think of it; the tree is the real thing’

‘Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character, give him power’

‘Be sure you put your feet in the right place, then stand firm’

Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865) was the 16th President of the United States, serving from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through its Civil War—its bloodiest war and its greatest moral, constitutional and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy. (Source: Wikipedia)

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John Locke

locke

‘As people are walking all the time, in the same spot, a path appears’

John Locke FRS (29 August 1632 – 28 October 1704), was an English philosopher and physician regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers and known as the “Father of Classical Liberalism”. (Source: Wikipedia)

 

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Nelson Mandela

Nelson Mandela

‘There is nothing like returning to a place that remains unchanged to find the ways in which you yourself have altered’

‘I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear.’

‘Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world’

‘We must use time wisely and forever realize that the time is always ripe to do right’

Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela (18 July 1918 – 5 December 2013) was a South African anti-apartheid revolutionary, politician and philanthropist who served as President of South Africa from 1994 to 1999. He was South Africa’s first black chief executive, and the first elected in a fully representative democratic election. His government focused on dismantling the legacy of apartheid through tackling institutionalised racism, poverty and inequality, and fostering racial reconciliation. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Thomas Mann

Thomas Mann

‘Speech is civilization itself… It is silence which isolates’

Paul Thomas Mann ( 6 June 1875 – 12 August 1955) was a German novelist, short story writer, social critic, philanthropist, essayist, and the 1929 Nobel Prize in Literature laureate. His highly symbolic and ironic epic novels and novellas are noted for their insight into the psychology of the artist and the intellectual. (Source: Wikipedia)

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W. Somerset Maugham

W. Somerset Maugham

‘It is not wealth one asks for, but just enough to preserve one’s dignity, to work unhampered, to be generous, frank and independent’

‘I always find it more difficult to say the things I mean than the things I don’t’

William Somerset Maugham (25 January 1874 – 16 December 1965) was a British playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era and reputedly the highest paid author during the 1930s. After losing both his parents by the age of 10, Maugham was raised by a paternal uncle who was emotionally cold. Not wanting to become a lawyer like other men in his family, Maugham eventually trained and qualified as a doctor. The first run of his first novel, Liza of Lambeth (1897), sold out so rapidly that Maugham gave up medicine to write full-time. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Arthur Miller

Arthur Miller

‘Maybe all one can do is hope to end up with the right regrets’

Arthur Asher Miller (October 17, 1915 – February 10, 2005) was an American playwright, essayist, and prominent figure in twentieth-century American theatre. Among his plays are All My Sons (1947), Death of a Salesman (1949), The Crucible (1953) and A View from the Bridge (1955, revised 1956). He also wrote the screenplay for the film The Misfits (1961). Miller was often in the public eye, particularly during the late 1940s, 1950s and early 1960s. During this time, he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Drama; testified before the House Un-American Activities Committee; and was married to Marilyn Monroe. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Henry Miller

Henry Miller

‘Develop interest in life as you see it; in people, things, literature, music – the world is so rich, simply throbbing with rich treasures, beautiful souls and interesting people. Forget yourself.’

‘The aim of life is to live – and to live means to be aware, joyously, drunkenly, serenely, divinely aware’

Henry Valentine Miller (December 26, 1891 – June 7, 1980) was an American writer. He was known for breaking with existing literary forms, developing a new sort of semi-autobiographical novel that blended character study, social criticism, philosophical reflection, explicit language, sex, surrealist free association and mysticism. His most characteristic works of this kind are Tropic of Cancer (1934), Black Spring (1936), Tropic of Capricorn (1939) and The Rosy Crucifixion trilogy (1949–59), all of which are based on his experiences in New York and Paris, and all of which were banned in the United States until 1961. (Source: Wikipedia)

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A.A. Milne

A.A. Milne by Howard Coster

‘Promise me you’ll always remember: You’re braver than you believe, and stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think’

Alan Alexander Milne ( 18 January 1882 – 31 January 1956) was an English author, best known for his books about the teddy bear Winnie-the-Pooh and for various children’s poems. Milne was a noted writer, primarily as a playwright, before the huge success of Pooh overshadowed all his previous work. (Source: Wikipedia)

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John Milton

John Milton

‘The mind is its own place, and in itself can make a Heaven of Hell, a Hell of Heaven’

John Milton (9 December 1608 – 8 November 1674) was an English poet, polemicist, man of letters, and a civil servant for the Commonwealth of England under Oliver Cromwell. He wrote at a time of religious flux and political upheaval, and is best known for his epic poem Paradise Lost (1667), written in blank verse. Milton’s poetry and prose reflect deep personal convictions, a passion for freedom and self-determination, and the urgent issues and political turbulence of his day. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Haruki Murakami

Murakami

‘Memories are what warm you up from the inside. But they’re also what tear you apart’

‘Whatever it is you’re seeking won’t come in the form you’re expecting’

Haruki Murakami (,born January 12, 1949) is a contemporary Japanese writer. Murakami has been translated into 50 languages and his best-selling books have sold millions of copies. His works of fiction and non-fiction have garnered critical acclaim and numerous awards, both in Japan and internationally, including the World Fantasy Award (2006) and the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award (2006), while his oeuvre received among others the Franz Kafka Prize (2006) and the Jerusalem Prize (2009). Murakami’s most notable works include A Wild Sheep Chase (1982), Norwegian Wood (1987), The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle (1994-1995), Kafka on the Shore (2002), and 1Q84 (2009–2010). He has also translated a number of English works into Japanese, from Raymond Carver to J. D. Salinger. (Source: Wikipedia)

 

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Pablo Neruda

Pablo Neruda

‘You can cut all the flowers but you cannot keep spring from coming’

Pablo Neruda was the pen name and, later, legal name of the Chilean poet-diplomat and politician Neftali Ricardo Reyes Basoalto (July 12, 1904 – September 23, 1973). He derived his pen name from the Czech poet Jan Neruda. In 1971 Pablo Neruda won the Nobel Prize for Literature. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Isaac Newton

Newton

‘If I have ever made any valuable discoveries, it has been owing more to patient attention, than to any other talent’

Sir Isaac Newton (25 December 1642 – 20 March 1726/7) was an English physicist and mathematician (described in his own day as a “natural philosopher”) who is widely recognised as one of the most influential scientists of all time and as a key figure in the scientific revolution. His book Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica (“Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy”), first published in 1687, laid the foundations for classical mechanics. Newton made seminal contributions to optics, and he shares credit with Gottfried Leibniz for the development of calculus. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Friedrich Nietzsche

Nietzsche

‘Thoughts are the shadows of our feelings – always darker, emptier, and simpler’

‘Without music, life would be a mistake’

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (15 October 1844 – 25 August 1900) was a German philologist, philosopher, cultural critic, poet and composer. He wrote texts on religion, morality, contemporary culture, philosophy and science. One of the key tenets of his philosophy is the concept of “life-affirmation,” which embraces the realities of the world in which we live over the idea of a world beyond. It further champions the creative powers of the individual to strive beyond social, cultural, and moral contexts. (Source Wikipedia)

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Anais Nin

Anais Nin

‘Life is truly known only to those who suffer, lose, endure adversity and stumble from defeat to defeat’

‘Age does not protect you from love. But love, to some extent, protects you from age.’

‘Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one’s courage’

Anaïs Nin (February 21, 1903 – January 14, 1977) was an author born to Cuban parents in France, where she was also raised. She spent some time in Spain and Cuba but lived most of her life in the United States where she became an established author. She wrote journals (which span more than 60 years, beginning when she was 11 years old and ending shortly before her death), critical studies, essays, short stories, and erotica. A great deal of her work, including Delta of Venus and Little Birds was published posthumously. (Source: Wikipedia)

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