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FAVOURITE QUOTES

MARK HAYSOM is the author of the critically acclaimed ‘Love, Love Me Do’ and ‘Imagine’. From time to time, he publishes favourite quotes from great writers, leaders and thinkers.

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William Hazlitt

William Hazlitt

‘Prosperity is a great teacher; adversity is a greater’

William Hazlitt (10 April 1778 – 18 September 1830) was an English writer, remembered for his humanistic essays and literary criticism, as the greatest art critic of his age, and as a drama critic, social commentator, and philosopher. He was also a painter. He is now considered one of the great critics and essayists of the English language, placed in the company of Samuel Johnson and George Orwell. Yet his work is currently little read and mostly out of print. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway

‘The world breaks everyone, and afterward, some are strong at the broken places’

‘The best way to find out if you can trust somebody is to trust them’

Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American author and journalist. His economical and understated style had a strong influence on 20th-century fiction, while his life of adventure and his public image influenced later generations. Hemingway produced most of his work between the mid-1920s and the mid-1950s, and won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954. He published seven novels, six short story collections, and two non-fiction works. (source: Wikipedia)

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Heraclitus

Heraclitus

‘There is nothing permanent except change’

Heraclitus of Ephesus (c. 535 – c. 475 BCE) was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher, a native of the Greek city Ephesus, Ionia, on the coast of Asia Minor. He was of distinguished parentage. Little is known about his early life and education, but he regarded himself as self-taught and a pioneer of wisdom. From the lonely life he led, and still more from the riddling and paradoxical nature of his philosophy and his stress upon the needless unconsciousness of humankind, he was called “The Obscure” and the “Weeping Philosopher”. Heraclitus is famous for his insistence on ever-present change in the universe. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Hermann Hesse

Hermann Hesse

‘Some of us think holding on makes us strong; but sometimes it is letting go’

‘We find consolations, we find numbing, we learn skilful ways to deceive ourselves’

Hermann Hesse (2 July 1877 – 9 August 1962) was a German born Swiss poet, novelist, and painter. His best-known works include Steppenwolf, Siddhartha, and The Glass Bead Game, each of which explores an individual’s search for authenticity, self-knowledge and spirituality. In 1946, he received the Nobel Prize in Literature. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Homer

The bust of Homer at the British Museum

‘The gods envy us. They envy us because we’re mortal, because any moment may be our last’

Homer is the name given to the author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, the two major epic poems to have survived from Ancient Greece. Nothing is known of Homer as a person. In fact, there is not even agreement on whether one person created both the Iliad and the Odyssey. Both poems seem to have been composed at some time between 750 and 650 BC, but it is thought they were shaped out of older material handed down verbally by singer-poets. Nonetheless, Homer is conventionally depicted as a blind, bearded man. (Source: BBC)

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Quintus Horatius Flaccus (Horace)

Horace

‘Remember when life’s path is steep to keep your mind even’

‘Wisdom is not wisdom when it is derived from books alone’

Quintus Horatius Flaccus (December 8, 65 BC – November 27, 8 BC), known in the English-speaking world as Horace, was the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus (also known as Octavian). Quintillian regarded his Odes as just about the only Latin lyrics worth reading: “He can be lofty sometimes, yet he is also full of charm and grace, versatile in his figures, and felicitously daring in his choice of words.” (Source: Wikipedia)

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Khaled Hosseini

Hosseini

‘When you tell a lie, you steal someone’s right to the truth’

Khaled Hosseini (born March 4, 1965) is an Afghan-born American novelist and physician. After graduating from college, he worked as a doctor in California, an occupation that he likened to “an arranged marriage”. He has published three novels, most notably his 2003 debut The Kite Runner, all of which are at least partially set in Afghanistan and feature an Afghan as the protagonist. Following the success of The Kite Runner he retired from medicine to write full-time. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Elbert Hubbard

Elbert Hubbard

‘He has achieved success who has worked well, laughed often, and loved much’

Elbert Green Hubbard (June 19, 1856 – May 7, 1915) was an American writer, publisher, artist, and philosopher. Raised in Hudson, Illinois, he met early success as a traveling salesman with the Larkin Soap Company. Today Hubbard is mostly known as the founder of the Roycroft artisan community in East Aurora, New York, an influential exponent of the Arts and Crafts Movement. Among his many publications were the nine-volume work Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great and the short story A Message to Garcia. He and his second wife, Alice Moore Hubbard, died aboard the RMS Lusitania, which was sunk by a German submarine off the coast of Ireland on May 7, 1915. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Victor Hugo

Victor Hugo

‘Strong and bitter words indicate a weak cause’

Change your opinions, keep to your principles; change your leaves, keep intact your roots’

Victor Marie Hugo (26 February 1802 – 22 May 1885) was a French poet, novelist, and dramatist of the Romantic movement. He is considered one of the greatest and best known French writers. In France, Hugo’s literary fame comes first from his poetry but also rests upon his novels and his dramatic achievements. Among many volumes of poetry, Les Contemplations and La Légende des siècles stand particularly high in critical esteem. Outside France, his best-known works are the acclaimed novels Les Misérables, 1862, and Notre-Dame de Paris, 1831 (known in English as The Hunchback of Notre-Dame). He also produced more than 4,000 drawings, which have since been admired for their beauty, and earned widespread respect as a campaigner for social causes such as the abolition of the death penalty. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Aldous Huxley

Huxley (2)

‘The secret of genius is to carry the spirit of the child into old age, which mean never losing your enthusiasm’

‘Experience is not what happens to you; it’s what you do with what happens to you’

Aldous Leonard Huxley (26 July 1894 – 22 November 1963) was an English writer, philosopher and a prominent member of the Huxley family. He was best known for his novels including Brave New World, set in a dystopian London, and for non-fiction books, such as The Doors of Perception, which recalls experiences when taking a psychedelic drug, and a wide-ranging output of essays. (Source: Wikipedia)

 

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William James

William James

‘The great use of a life is to spend for something that outlasts it’

‘Believe that life is worth living and your belief will help create the fact’

William James (January 11, 1842 – August 26, 1910) was an American philosopher and psychologist who was also trained as a physician. The first educator to offer a psychology course in the United States, James was one of the leading thinkers of the late nineteenth century and is believed by many to be one of the most influential philosophers the United States has ever produced, while others have labelled him the “Father of American psychology”. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Thomas Jefferson

Jefferson

‘I hope our wisdom will grow with our power, and teach us, that the less we use our power the greater it will be’

Thomas Jefferson (April 13 1743 – July 4, 1826) was an American Founding Father, the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and the third President of the United States (1801–1809). He was an ardent proponent of democracy and embraced the principles of republicanism and the rights of the individual with worldwide influence. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Samuel Johnson

Samuel Johnson

‘Self-confidence is the first requisite to great undertakings’

‘Adversity is the state in which man most easily becomes acquainted with himself, being especially free of admirers then.’

‘Courage is the greatest of all virtues, because if you haven’t courage, you may not have an opportunity to use any of the others’

‘Nothing will ever be attempted if all possible objections must be first overcome’

Samuel Johnson (18 September 1709 – 13 December 1784), often referred to as Dr Johnson, was an English writer who made lasting contributions to English literature as a poet, essayist, moralist, literary critic, biographer, editor and lexicographer. Johnson was a devout Anglican and committed Tory, and has been described as “arguably the most distinguished man of letters in English history”. He is also the subject of “the most famous single work of biographical art in the whole of literature”: James Boswell’s Life of Samuel Johnson.

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Erica Jong

Erica Jong

‘Advice is what we ask for when we already know the answer but wish we didn’t’

Erica Jong (née Mann; born March 26, 1942) is an American author and teacher best known for her fiction and poetry, and particularly for her 1973 novel Fear of Flying. The book became famously controversial for its attitudes towards female sexuality and figured prominently in the development of second-wave feminism. According to Washington Post, it has sold more than 20 million copies worldwide. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Carl Jung

Carl Jung

‘We cannot change anything until we accept it. Condemnation does not liberate, it oppresses’

Carl Gustav Jung (26 July 1875 – 6 June 1961), often referred to as C. G. Jung, was a Swiss psychiatrist and psychotherapist who founded analytical psychology. His work has been influential not only in psychiatry but also in philosophy, anthropology, archaeology, literature, and religious studies. He was a prolific writer, though many of his works were not published until after his death. (Source:Wikipedia)

 

 

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Helen Keller

Helen Keller

‘Life is either a daring adventure or nothing’

Helen Adams Keller (June 27, 1880 – June 1, 1968) was an American author, political activist, and lecturer. She was the first deafblind person to earn a bachelor of arts degree. The story of how Keller’s teacher, Anne Sullivan, broke through the isolation imposed by a near complete lack of language, allowing the girl to blossom as she learned to communicate, has become widely known through the dramatic depictions of the play and film The Miracle Worker.

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John F. Kennedy

John F Kennedy

‘Our problems are man-made, therefore they may be solved by man. No problem of human destiny is beyond human beings.’

‘We need men who can dream of things that never were’

John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), commonly known as Jack Kennedy or by his initials JFK, was an American politician who served as the 35th President of the United States from January 1961 until his assassination in November 1963. Notable events that occurred during his presidency included the Bay of Pigs Invasion, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, Police Week, the establishment of the Peace Corps, the Space Race, the building of the Berlin Wall, the African-American Civil Rights Movement, and the increased U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Jack Kerouac

Jack Kerouac

‘Live, travel, adventure, bless, and don’t be sorry’

Jack Kerouac (Jean-Louis Lebris de Kérouac) ( March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969) was an American novelist and poet. He is considered a literary iconoclast and, alongside William S. Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg, a pioneer of the Beat Generation. Kerouac is recognized for his method of spontaneous prose. Thematically, his work covers topics such as Catholic spirituality, jazz, promiscuity, Buddhism, drugs, poverty, and travel. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Martin Luther King, Jr.

Martin Luther King‘The function of education is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically. Intelligence plus character – that is the goal of true education’

‘Freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed’

‘Life’s most persistent and urgent question is, ‘What are you doing for others?’

Martin Luther King, Jr., (January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968) was an American Baptist minister, activist, humanitarian, and leader in the African-American Civil Rights Movement. He is best known for his role in the advancement of civil rights using nonviolent civil disobedience based on his Christian beliefs. On October 14, 1964, King received the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolence. In 1965, he helped to organize the Selma to Montgomery marches, and the following year he and SCLC took the movement north to Chicago to work on segregated housing. In the final years of his life, King expanded his focus to include poverty and speak against the Vietnam War, alienating many of his liberal allies with a 1967 speech titled “Beyond Vietnam”. In 1968, King was planning a national occupation of Washington, D.C., to be called the Poor People’s Campaign, when he was assassinated on April 4 in Memphis, Tennessee. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling

‘Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind’

Joseph Rudyard Kipling; 30 December 1865 – 18 January 1936) was an English short-story writer, poet, and novelist. He wrote tales and poems of British soldiers in India and stories for children. He was born in Bombay, in the Bombay Presidency of British India, and was taken by his family to England when he was five years old. Kipling’s works of fiction include The Jungle Book (1894), Kim (1901), and many short stories, including “The Man Who Would Be King” (1888). His poems include “Mandalay (1890), “Gunga Din” (1890), “The Gods of the Copybook Headings” (1919), “The White Man’s Burden (1899), and “If—” (1910). (Source: Wikipedia)

 

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