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FAVOURITE QUOTES

MARK HAYSOM is the author of the critically acclaimed ‘Love, Love Me Do’ and ‘Imagine’. From time to time, he publishes favourite quotes from great writers, leaders and thinkers.

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Albert Einstein

Einstein

‘Anger dwells only in the bosom of fools’

‘Everyone should be respected as an individual, but no one idolized’

‘Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new’

‘It is not that I’m so smart. But I stay with the questions much longer’

‘Strive not to be a success, but rather to be of value’

‘Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must keep moving’

Albert Einstein (14 March 1879 – 18 April 1955) was a German-born theoretical physicist and philosopher of science. He developed the general theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics (alongside quantum mechanics). He is best known in popular culture for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2 (which has been dubbed “the world’s most famous equation”). He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics. (Source: Wikipedia)

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George Eliot

George Eliot

‘It is never too late to be what you might have been’

Mary Ann Evans (22 November 1819 – 22 December 1880), known by her pen name George Eliot, was an English novelist, journalist, translator and one of the leading writers of the Victorian era. She is the author of seven novels, including Adam Bede (1859), The Mill on the Floss (1860), Silas Marner (1861), Middlemarch (1871–72), and Daniel Deronda (1876), most of them set in provincial England and known for their realism and psychological insight. She used a male pen name, she said, to ensure her works would be taken seriously. Female authors were published under their own names during Eliot’s life, but she wanted to escape the stereotype of women only writing lighthearted romances. (Source: Wikipedia)

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T.S. Eliot

TS Eliot

‘To do the useful thing, to say the courageous thing, to contemplate the beautiful thing: that is enough for one man’s life’

‘Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go’

Thomas Stearns Eliot OM (26 September 1888 – 4 January 1965) was an essayist, publisher, playwright, literary and social critic, and one of the twentieth century’s major poets. He was born in St. Louis, Missouri. However he emigrated to England in 1914 (at age 25) and was naturalised as a British subject in 1927 at age 39, renouncing his American citizenship. Eliot attracted widespread attention for his poem The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock (1915), which is seen as a masterpiece of the Modernist movement. It was followed by some of the best-known poems in the English language, including The Waste Land (1922), The Hollow Men (1925), Ash Wednesday (1930) and Four Quartets (1945). He is also known for his seven plays, particularly Murder in the Cathedral (1935). He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948, “for his outstanding, pioneer contribution to present-day poetry.” (Source: Wikipedia)

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Ralph Waldo Emerson

10. Emerson

‘Nothing astonishes men so much as common sense and plain dealing’

‘Shallow men believe in luck. Strong men believe in cause and effect.’

‘For every minute you remain angry, you give up sixty seconds of peace of mind’

‘Nothing can bring you peace but yourself’

‘The only person you are destined to become is the person you decide to be’

‘It is not length of life, but depth of life’

‘Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail’

‘All life is an experiment. The more experiments you make the better’

‘To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment’

 Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, lecturer, and poet, who led the Transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was seen as a champion of individualism and a prescient critic of the countervailing pressures of society, and he disseminated his thoughts through dozens of published essays and more than 1,500 public lectures across the United States. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Epictetus

Epictetus

‘The key is to keep company only with people who uplift you, whose presence calls forth your best’

Epictetus (A.D. c. 55 – 135) was a Greek Stoic philosopher. He was born a slave at Hierapolis, Phrygia (present day Pamukkale, Turkey), and lived in Rome until his banishment, when he went to Nicopolis in north-western Greece for the rest of his life. His teachings were written down and published by his pupil Arrian in his Discourses. Epictetus taught that philosophy is a way of life and not just a theoretical discipline. To Epictetus, all external events are determined by fate, and are thus beyond our control; we should accept whatever happens calmly and dispassionately. However, individuals are responsible for their own actions, which they can examine and control through rigorous self-discipline. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Euripides

Euripides

‘Youth is the best time to be rich, and the best time to be poor’

Euripides (c. 480 – 406 BC) was a tragedian of classical Athens. He is one of the three whose plays have survived, with the other two being Aeschylus and Sophocles. Some ancient scholars attributed ninety-five plays to him but according to the Suda it was ninety-two at most. Of these, eighteen or nineteen have survived more or less complete. (Source¨Wikipedia)

 

 

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E. M. Forster

Forster

‘We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us’

Edward Morgan Forster OM, CH (1 January 1879 – 7 June 1970) was an English novelist, short story writer, essayist and librettist. He is known best for his ironic and well-plotted novels examining class difference and hypocrisy in early 20th-century British society. Forster’s humanistic impulse toward understanding and sympathy may be aptly summed up in the epigraph to his 1910 novel Howards End: “Only connect … “. His 1908 novel, A Room with a View, is his most optimistic work, while A Passage to India (1924) brought him his greatest success.

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Anatole France

Anatole France

‘To accomplish great things, we must not only act, but also dream; not only plan, but also believe’

‘Nine tenths of education is encouragement’

‘It is by acts and not by ideas that people live’

Anatole France (born François-Anatole Thibault, 16 April 1844 – 12 October 1924) was a French poet, journalist, and novelist. He was born in Paris, and died in Saint-Cyr-sur-Loire. He was a successful novelist, with several best-sellers. Ironic and skeptical, he was considered in his day the ideal French man of letters. He was a member of the Académie française, and won the 1921 Nobel Prize for Literature “in recognition of his brilliant literary achievements, characterized as they are by a nobility of style, a profound human sympathy, grace, and a true Gallic temperament”. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Anne Frank

Anne Frank

‘I don’t think of all the misery but of the beauty that still remains’

Annelies Marie “Anne” Frank (12 June 1929 – February 1945) was a diarist and writer. She is one of the most discussed Jewish victims of the Holocaust. Her wartime diary The Diary of a Young Girl has been the basis for several plays and films. Born in the city of Frankfurt in Weimar Germany, she lived most of her life in or near Amsterdam, in the Netherlands. Born a German national, Frank lost her citizenship in 1941. She gained international fame posthumously after her diary was published. It documents her experiences hiding during the German occupation of the Netherlands in World War II. (Source¨Wikipedia)

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Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin

‘At twenty years of age, the will reigns; at thirty the wit; at forty the judgement.’

‘Whatever is begun in anger ends in shame’

‘Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.’

Benjamin Franklin FRS (January 17, 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States and in many ways was “the First American”. A renowned polymath, Franklin was a leading author, printer, political theorist, politician, postmaster, scientist, inventor, civic activist, statesman, and diplomat. As a scientist, he was a major figure in the American Enlightenment and the history of physics for his discoveries and theories regarding electricity. As an inventor, he is known for the lightning rod, bifocals, and the Franklin stove, among other inventions. He facilitated many civic organizations, including Philadelphia’s fire department and a university.

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Robert Frost

Robert Frost

‘Education is the ability to listen to almost anything without losing your temper or your self-confidence’

‘By working faithfully eight hours a day you may eventually get to be boss and work twelve hours a day’

‘A person will sometimes devote all his life to the development of one part of his body – the wishbone’

‘Happiness makes up in height for what it lacks in length’

‘In three words I can sum up everything I’ve learned about life: it goes on’

Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. His work was initially published in England before it was published in America. He is highly regarded for his realistic depictions of rural life and his command of American colloquial speech. His work frequently employed settings from rural life in New England in the early twentieth century, using them to examine complex social and philosophical themes. One of the most popular and critically respected American poets of the twentieth century, Frost was honored frequently during his lifetime, receiving four Pulitzer Prizes for Poetry. (Source: Wikipedia)

 

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John Galsworthy

John Galsworthy

‘Love has no age, no limit; and no death’

John Galsworthy OM (14 August 1867 – 31 January 1933) was an English novelist and playwright. Notable works include The Forsyte Saga (1906–1921) and its sequels, A Modern Comedy and End of the Chapter. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1932. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Mahatma Gandhi

Mahatma Gandhi

‘The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong.’

‘Anger and intolerance are the enemies of correct understanding’

‘Strength does not come from physical capacity. It comes from an indomitable will’

‘Happiness is when what you think, what you say, and what you do are in harmony’

‘You must be the change you wish to see in the world’

‘Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever’

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi(2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) was the preeminent leader of Indian independence movement in British-ruled India. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. Gandhi was a prolific writer. One of Gandhi’s earliest publications, Hind Swaraj, published in Gujarati in 1909, is recognised as the intellectual blueprint of India’s independence movement. For decades he edited several newspapers including Harijan in Gujarati, in Hindi and in the English language; Indian Opinion while in South Africa and, Young India, in English, and Navajivan, a Gujarati monthly, on his return to India. Gandhi also wrote several books including his autobiography, The Story of My Experiments with Truth , of which he bought the entire first edition to make sure it was reprinted. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Edward Gibbon

BBC206171

‘History is indeed little more than the register of the crimes, follies and misfortunes of mankind’

Edward Gibbon (8 May 1737 – 16 January 1794) was an English historian and Member of Parliament. His most important work, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, was published in six volumes between 1776 and 1788. The Decline and Fall is known for the quality and irony of its prose, its use of primary sources, and its open criticism of organised religion. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Andre Gide

Gide

‘There are admirable potentialities in every human being. Believe in your strength and your youth. Learn to repeat endlessly to yourself, “It all depends on me”’

‘Man cannot discover new oceans unless he has the courage to lose sight of the shore’ Andre Gide

André Paul Guillaume Gide (22 November 1869 – 19 February 1951) was a French author and winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1947 “for his comprehensive and artistically significant writings, in which human problems and conditions have been presented with a fearless love of truth and keen psychological insight”. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Oliver Goldsmith

Oliver Goldsmith

‘Success consists of getting up just one more time than you fall’

Oliver Goldsmith (10 November 1728 – 4 April 1774) was an Anglo-Irish novelist, playwright and poet, who is best known for his novel The Vicar of Wakefield (1766), his pastoral poem The Deserted Village (1770), and his plays The Good-Natur’d Man (1768) and She Stoops to Conquer (1771, first performed in 1773). He also wrote An History of the Earth and Animated Nature. He is thought to have written the classic children’s tale The History of Little Goody Two-Shoes, the source of the phrase “goody two-shoes”. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Graham Greene

Graham Greene

‘We forget very easily, what gives us pain’

Henry Graham Greene (2 October 1904 – 3 April 1991) was an English novelist and author regarded as one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. Combining literary acclaim with widespread popularity, Greene had acquired a reputation early in his own lifetime as a great writer, both of serious Catholic novels and of thrillers (or “entertainments ” as he termed them); however, even though shortlisted in 1967, he was never awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. Through 67 years of writings which included over 25 novels, he explored the ambivalent moral and political issues of the modern world through a Catholic perspective. (Source: Wikipedia)

 

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