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FAVOURITE QUOTES

MARK HAYSOM is the author of the critically acclaimed ‘Love, Love Me Do’ and ‘Imagine’. From time to time, he publishes favourite quotes from great writers, leaders and thinkers.

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JbcabellJames Branch Cabell

‘The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears this is true’

James Branch Cabell (April 14, 1879  – May 5, 1958) was an American author of fantasy fiction and belles lettres. Cabell was well regarded by his contemporaries, including H. L. Mencken, Edmund Wilson, and Sinclair Lewis. His works were considered escapist and fit well in the culture of the 1920s, when they were most popular. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Albert Camus

Albert Camus‘Autumn is a second spring when every leaf is a flower’

Albert Camus (7 November 1913 – 4 January 1960) was a French Nobel Prize–winning author, journalist, and philosopher. His views contributed to the rise of the philosophy known as absurdism. He wrote in his essay The Rebel that his whole life was devoted to opposing the philosophy of nihilism while still delving deeply into individual freedom. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Truman Capote

Truman Capote

‘Failure is the condiment that gives success its flavour’

‘Life is a moderately good play with a badly written third act’

Truman Streckfus Persons (September 30, 1924 – August 25, 1984), known as Truman Capote was an American author, screenwriter, playwright, actor, many of whose short stories, novels, plays, and nonfiction are recognized literary classics, including the novella Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1958) and the true crime novel In Cold Blood (1966), which he labelled a “nonfiction novel.” At least 20 films and television dramas have been produced of Capote novels, stories, and plays. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Thomas Carlyle

Thomas Carlyle

‘The greatest of faults, I should say, is to be conscious of none’

Thomas Carlyle (4 December 1795 – 5 February 1881) was a Scottish philosopher, satirical writer, essayist, historian and teacher. Considered one of the most important social commentators of his time, he presented many lectures during his lifetime with certain acclaim in the Victorian era. One of those conferences resulted in his famous work On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and The Heroic in History where he explains that the key role in history lies in the actions of the “Great Man”, claiming that “History is nothing but the biography of the Great Man”. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Lewis Carroll

Lewis Carroll

‘If you don’t know where you are going, any road will get you there’

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by his pen name, Lewis Carroll, was an English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon and photographer. His most famous writings are Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, its sequel Through the Looking-Glass, which includes the poems Jabberwocky and The Hunting of the Snark. (Source: Wikipedia)

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G. K. Chesterton

Gilbert Chesterton

‘I owe my success to having listened respectfully to the very best advice, and then going away and doing the exact opposite’

‘Do not free a camel of the burden of his hump; you may be freeing him from being a camel’

Gilbert Keith Chesterton, (29 May 1874 – 14 June 1936) better known as G. K. Chesterton, was an English writer, lay theologian, poet, philosopher, dramatist, journalist, orator, literary and art critic, biographer, and Christian apologist. Chesterton is often referred to as the “prince of paradox.” Time magazine, in a review of a biography of Chesterton, observed of his writing style: “Whenever possible Chesterton made his points with popular sayings, proverbs, allegories—first carefully turning them inside out.” (Source: Wikipedia)

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Winston Churchill

Winston Churchill

‘It’s not enough that we do our best; sometimes we have to do what’s required’

‘It is a mistake to try to look too far ahead. The chain of destiny can only be grasped one link at a time.’

‘I like pigs. Dogs look up to us. Cats look down on us. Pigs treat us as equals.’

‘This is no time for ease and comfort. It is time to dare and endure.’

‘Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen’

‘Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts’

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, DL, FRS, RA (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British politician who was Prime Minister from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. Widely regarded as one of the greatest wartime leaders of the 20th century, Churchill was also an officer in the British Army, a historian, a writer (as Winston S. Churchill), and an artist. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature, and was the first person to be made an honorary citizen of the United States.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Marcus Tullius Cicero

‘Friendship makes prosperity more shining and lessens adversity by dividing and sharing it.’

‘A room without books is like a body without a soul’

‘Cultivation to the mind is as necessary as food to the body’

‘It is foolish to tear one’s hair in grief, as though sorrow would be made less by baldness’

‘If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need’

Marcus Tullius Cicero (3 January 106 BC – 7 December 43 BC), was a Roman philosopher, politician, lawyer, orator, political theorist, consul and constitutionalist. He came from a wealthy municipal family of the Roman equestrian order, and is widely considered one of Rome’s greatest orators and prose stylists. His influence on the Latin language was so immense that the subsequent history of prose, in not only Latin but European languages up to the 19th century, was said to be either a reaction against or a return to his style. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette

Sidonie Gabrielle Colette

‘Be happy. It’s one way of being wise’

Colette was the surname of the French novelist and performer Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (28 January 1873 – 3 August 1954). She is best known for her novel Gigi, the basis for the film and Lerner and Loewe stage production of the same title. Colette was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Confucius

Confucious

‘Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it’

‘The superior man is modest in his speech, but exceeds in his actions’

‘You cannot open a book without learning something’

‘Only the wisest and stupidest of men never change’

Confucius (551–479 BC) was a Chinese teacher, editor, politician, and philosopher of the Spring and Autumn period of Chinese history. The philosophy of Confucius emphasized personal and governmental morality, correctness of social relationships, justice and sincerity. Confucius is traditionally credited with having authored or edited many of the Chinese classic texts including all of the Five Classics, but modern scholars are cautious of attributing specific assertions to Confucius himself. (Source: Wikipedia)

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John Constable

Constable

‘I never saw an ugly thing in my life: for let the form of an object be what it may – light, shade, and perspective will always make it beautiful.’

John Constable, RA (11 June 1776 – 31 March 1837) was an English Romantic painter. Born in Suffolk, he is known principally for his landscape paintings of Dedham Vale, the area surrounding his home—now known as “Constable Country”—which he invested with an intensity of affection. “I should paint my own places best”, he wrote to his friend John Fisher in 1821, “painting is but another word for feeling”. His most famous paintings include Wivenhoe Park of 1816, Dedham Vale of 1802 and The Hay Wain of 1821. (Source: Wikipedia)

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William Cowper

William Cowper

‘Knowledge is proud that it knows so much; wisdom is humble that it knows no more’

William Cowper (26 November 1731 – 25 April 1800) was an English poet and hymnodist. One of the most popular poets of his time, Cowper changed the direction of 18th century nature poetry by writing of everyday life and scenes of the English countryside. In many ways, he was one of the forerunners of Romantic poetry. Samuel Taylor Coleridge called him “the best modern poet”, whilst William Wordsworth particularly admired his poem Yardley-Oak. (Source: Wikipedia)

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e e cummings

E E Cummings

‘Unless you love someone, nothing else makes sense’

‘The most wasted of all days is one without laughter’

Edward Estlin Cummings (October 14, 1894 – September 3, 1962), known as E. E. Cummings, with the abbreviated form of his name often written by others in lowercase letters as e e cummings (in the style of some of his poems), was an American poet, painter, essayist, author, and playwright. His body of work encompasses approximately 2,900 poems, two autobiographical novels, four plays and several essays, as well as numerous drawings and paintings. (Source: Wikipedia)

 

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Charles Darwin

Charles Darwin

‘In the long history of humankind (and animal kind, too) those who learned to collaborate and improvise most effectively have prevailed’

Charles Robert Darwin (12 February 1809 – 19 April 1882) was an English naturalist and geologist, best known for his contributions to evolutionary theory. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors, and in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding. Darwin published his theory of evolution with compelling evidence in his 1859 book On the Origin of Species. By the 1870s the scientific community and much of the general public had accepted evolution as a fact. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Elmer Davis

Elmer Davis

‘The first and greatest commandment is: Don’t let them scare you’

Elmer Davis (January 13, 1890 – May 18, 1958) was a news reporter, author, the Director of the United States Office of War Information during World War II and a Peabody Award recipient. Davis was considered to be one of the greatest American news reporters of the mid-20th century. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens

‘There are dark shadows on the earth, but its lights are stronger in the contrast’

‘I have been bent and broken, but – I hope – into a better shape’

‘There is a wisdom of the head, and a wisdom of the heart’

Charles John Huffam Dickens ( 7 February 1812 – 9 June 1870) was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded as the greatest novelist of the Victorian period. During his lifetime, his works enjoyed unprecedented popularity, and by the twentieth century critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories enjoy lasting popularity. His 1843 novella, A Christmas Carol, remains popular and continues to inspire adaptations in every artistic genre. Oliver Twist and Great Expectations are also frequently adapted, and, like many of his novels, evoke images of early Victorian London. His 1859 novel, A Tale of Two Cities, set in London and Paris, is his best known work of historical fiction. Dickens’s creative genius has been praised by fellow writers—from Leo Tolstoy to George Orwell and G. K. Chesterton—for its realism, comedy, prose style, unique characterisations, and social criticism. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson

‘Old age comes on suddenly, and not gradually as is thought’

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson (December 10, 1830 – May 15, 1886) was an American poet. Born in Amherst, Massachusetts, to a successful family with strong community ties, she lived a mostly introverted and reclusive life. Considered an eccentric by the locals, she became known for her penchant for white clothing and her reluctance to greet guests or, later in life, even leave her room. Most of her friendships were therefore carried out by correspondence. While Dickinson was a prolific private poet, fewer than a dozen of her nearly 1,800 poems were published during her lifetime. Dickinson is now almost universally considered to be one of the most important American poets.(Source: Wikipedia)

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Joan Didion

Didion

‘Character – the willingness to accept responsibility for one’s own life – is the source from which self-respect springs’

‘To free us from the expectations of others, to give us back to ourselves – there lies the great, singular power of self-respect’

‘Life changes fast. Life changes in the instant. You sit down to dinner and life as you know it ends’

‘You have to pick the places you don’t walk away from’

‘We tell ourselves stories in order to live’

Joan Didion (born December 5, 1934) is an American author best known for her novels and her literary journalism. Her novels and essays explore the disintegration of American morals and cultural chaos, where the overriding theme is individual and social fragmentation. A sense of anxiety or dread permeates much of her work. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Benjamin Disraeli

Disraeli

‘Bore: one who has the power of speech but not the capacity for conversation’

Benjamin Disraeli, Earl of Beaconsfield, (21 December 1804 – 19 April 1881) was a British Conservative politician and writer, who twice served as Prime Minister. He played a central role in the creation of the modern Conservative Party, defining its policies and its broad outreach. Disraeli is remembered for his influential voice in world affairs, his political battles with the Liberal leader William Ewart Gladstone, and his one-nation conservatism or “Tory democracy”. He is the only British Prime Minister of Jewish birth. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Arthur Conan Doyle

Conan Doyle

‘When you have eliminated all which is impossible, then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth’

‘It has long been an axiom of mine that the little things are infinitely the most important’

Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle KStJ, DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a Scottish writer and physician, most noted for his fictional stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered milestones in the field of crime fiction. He is also known for writing the fictional adventures of a second character he invented, Professor Challenger, and for popularising the mystery of the Mary Celeste. He was a prolific writer whose other works include fantasy and science fiction stories, plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction and historical novels. (Source: Wikipedia)

 

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