April 2015

Mark Haysom is the author of the critically acclaimed ‘Love, Love Me Do’ and ‘Imagine’. Here he publishes his favourite quotes from great writers and great thinkers.

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William James‘Believe that life is worth living and your belief will help create the fact’ William James

William James (January 11, 1842 – August 26, 1910) was an American philosopher and psychologist who was also trained as a physician. The first educator to offer a psychology course in the United States, James was one of the leading thinkers of the late nineteenth century and is believed by many to be one of the most influential philosophers the United States has ever produced, while others have labelled him the “Father of American psychology”. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Anais Nin‘Age does not protect you from love. But love, to some extent, protects you from age.’ Anais Nin

Anaïs Nin (February 21, 1903 – January 14, 1977) was an author born to Cuban parents in France, where she was also raised. She spent some time in Spain and Cuba but lived most of her life in the United States where she became an established author. She wrote journals (which span more than 60 years, beginning when she was 11 years old and ending shortly before her death), critical studies, essays, short stories, and erotica. A great deal of her work, including Delta of Venus and Little Birds was published posthumously. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Rilke‘Love consists in this, that two solitudes protect and touch and greet each other’ Rainer Maria Rilke

René Karl Wilhelm Johann Josef Maria Rilke (4 December 1875 – 29 December 1926) — better known as Rainer Maria Rilke — was a Bohemian-Austrian poet and novelist, “widely recognized as one of the most lyrically intense German-language poets”, writing in both verse and highly lyrical prose. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Mahatma Gandhi‘Happiness is when what you think, what you say, and what you do are in harmony’ Mahatma Gandhi

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi(2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) was the preeminent leader of Indian independence movement in British-ruled India. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. Gandhi was a prolific writer. One of Gandhi’s earliest publications, Hind Swaraj, published in Gujarati in 1909, is recognised as the intellectual blueprint of India’s independence movement. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Oscar Wilde

‘To have become a deeper man is the privilege of those who have suffered’ Oscar Wilde

Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde (16 October 1854 – 30 November 1900) was an Irish writer and poet. After writing in different forms throughout the 1880s, he became one of London’s most popular playwrights in the early 1890s. Today he is remembered for his epigrams, his novel The Picture of Dorian Gray, his plays, and the circumstances of his imprisonment and early death. At the height of his fame and success, while his masterpiece, The Importance of Being Earnest (1895), was still on stage in London, Wilde had the Marquess of Queensberry prosecuted for libel. The Marquess was the father of Wilde’s lover, Lord Alfred Douglas. The charge carried a penalty of up to two years in prison. The trial unearthed evidence that caused Wilde to drop his charges and led to his own arrest and trial for gross indecency with other men. After two more trials he was convicted and imprisoned for two years’ hard labour. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Henry David Thoreau

‘I know of no more encouraging fact than the unquestioned ability of a man to elevate his life by conscious endeavour’ Henry David Thoreau

Henry David Thoreau (July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862) was an American author, poet, philosopher, abolitionist, naturalist, tax resister, development critic, surveyor, and historian. A leading transcendentalist, Thoreau is best known for his book Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay Resistance to Civil Government (also known as Civil Disobedience), an argument for disobedience to an unjust state. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Conan Doyle

‘When you have eliminated all which is impossible, then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth’ Arthur Conan Doyle

Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle KStJ, DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a Scottish writer and physician, most noted for his fictional stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered milestones in the field of crime fiction. He is also known for writing the fictional adventures of a second character he invented, Professor Challenger, and for popularising the mystery of the Mary Celeste. He was a prolific writer whose other works include fantasy and science fiction stories, plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction and historical novels. (Source: Wikipedia)

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John Steinbeck

‘No one wants advice – only corroboration’ John Steinbeck

John Ernst Steinbeck, Jr. (February 26, 1902 – December 20, 1968) was an American author of twenty-seven books, including sixteen novels, six non-fiction books, and five collections of short stories. He is widely known for the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Grapes of Wrath (1939), East of Eden (1952) and the novella Of Mice and Men (1937). (Source: Wikipedia)

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Carl Jung

‘We cannot change anything until we accept it. Condemnation does not liberate, it oppresses’ Carl Jung

Carl Gustav Jung (26 July 1875 – 6 June 1961), often referred to as C. G. Jung, was a Swiss psychiatrist and psychotherapist who founded analytical psychology. His work has been influential not only in psychiatry but also in philosophy, anthropology, archaeology, literature, and religious studies. He was a prolific writer, though many of his works were not published until after his death. (Source:Wikipedia)

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Samuel Johnson

‘Nothing will ever be attempted if all possible objections must be first overcome’ Samuel Johnson

Samuel Johnson (18 September 1709 – 13 December 1784), often referred to as Dr Johnson, was an English writer who made lasting contributions to English literature as a poet, essayist, moralist, literary critic, biographer, editor and lexicographer. Johnson was a devout Anglican and committed Tory, and has been described as “arguably the most distinguished man of letters in English history”. He is also the subject of “the most famous single work of biographical art in the whole of literature”: James Boswell’s Life of Samuel Johnson.

 Thomas Aquinas

‘There is nothing on this earth more to be prized than true friendship’ Thomas Aquinas

Thomas Aquinas, ( 1225 – 7 March 1274), also Thomas of Aquin or Aquino, was an Italian Dominican friar and Catholic priest who was an immensely influential philosopher and theologian in the tradition of scholasticism, within which he is also known as the “Doctor Angelicus” and “Doctor Communis”. “Aquinas” is from the county of Aquino, an area where his family held land until 1137. He was born in Roccasecca, Italy. (Source:Wikipedia)

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10. Emerson

‘Nothing can bring you peace but yourself’ Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, lecturer, and poet, who led the Transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was seen as a champion of individualism and a prescient critic of the countervailing pressures of society, and he disseminated his thoughts through dozens of published essays and more than 1,500 public lectures across the United States. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Leo Tolstoy

‘Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them’ Leo Tolstoy

Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy (28 August] 1828 – 20 November 1910), commonly referred to as Leo Tolstoy, was a Russian novelist, short story writer, essayist, playwright and philosopher who primarily wrote novels and short stories. Tolstoy was a master of realistic fiction and is widely considered one of the greatest novelists of all time. He is best known for two long novels, War and Peace (1869) and Anna Karenina (1877). (Source: Wikipedia)

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Elmer Davis

‘The first and greatest commandment is: Don’t let them scare you’ Elmer Davis

Elmer Davis (January 13, 1890 – May 18, 1958) was a news reporter, author, the Director of the United States Office of War Information during World War II and a Peabody Award recipient. Davis was considered to be one of the greatest American news reporters of the mid-20th century. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Seneca

‘One of the most beautiful qualities of true friendship is to understand and to be understood’ Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Lucius Annaeus Seneca (often known as Seneca the Younger or simply Seneca c. 4 BC – AD 65) was a Roman Stoic philosopher, statesman, dramatist, and in one work humorist, of the Silver Age of Latin literature. He was a tutor and later advisor to emperor Nero. While he was forced to commit suicide for alleged complicity in the Pisonian conspiracy to assassinate Nero, he may have been innocent. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Winston Churchill

‘Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts’ Winston Churchill

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, DL, FRS, RA (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British politician who was Prime Minister from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. Widely regarded as one of the greatest wartime leaders of the 20th century, Churchill was also an officer in the British Army, a historian, a writer (as Winston S. Churchill), and an artist. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature, and was the first person to be made an honorary citizen of the United States.

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‘Change your opinions, keep to your principles; change your leaves, keep intact your roots’ Victor Hugo

Victor Marie Hugo (26 February 1802 – 22 May 1885) was a French poet, novelist, and dramatist of the Romantic movement. He is considered one of the greatest and best known French writers. In France, Hugo’s literary fame comes first from his poetry but also rests upon his novels and his dramatic achievements. Among many volumes of poetry, Les Contemplations and La Légende des siècles stand particularly high in critical esteem. Outside France, his best-known works are the acclaimed novels Les Misérables, 1862, and Notre-Dame de Paris, 1831 (known in English as The Hunchback of Notre-Dame). He also produced more than 4,000 drawings, which have since been admired for their beauty, and earned widespread respect as a campaigner for social causes such as the abolition of the death penalty. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Elbert Hubbard

‘He has achieved success who has worked well, laughed often, and loved much’ Elbert Hubbard

Elbert Green Hubbard (June 19, 1856 – May 7, 1915) was an American writer, publisher, artist, and philosopher. Raised in Hudson, Illinois, he met early success as a traveling salesman with the Larkin Soap Company. Today Hubbard is mostly known as the founder of the Roycroft artisan community in East Aurora, New York, an influential exponent of the Arts and Crafts Movement. Among his many publications were the nine-volume work Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great and the short story A Message to Garcia. He and his second wife, Alice Moore Hubbard, died aboard the RMS Lusitania, which was sunk by a German submarine off the coast of Ireland on May 7, 1915. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Einstein

‘Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new’ Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein (14 March 1879 – 18 April 1955) was a German-born theoretical physicist and philosopher of science. He developed the general theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics (alongside quantum mechanics). He is best known in popular culture for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2 (which has been dubbed “the world’s most famous equation”). He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics. (Source: Wikipedia)

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George Sand

‘There is only one happiness in this life, to love and be loved’ George Sand

Amantine-Lucile-Aurore Dupin (1 July 1804 – 8 June 1876), best known by her pseudonym George Sand, was a French novelist and memoirist. She is equally well known for her much publicized romantic affairs with a number of artists, including the composer and pianist Frédéric Chopin and the writer Alfred de Musset. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Mark Twain 2

‘A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes’ Mark Twain

Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910), better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was an American author and humorist. He wrote The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and its sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885. Twain grew up in Hannibal, Missouri, which provided the setting for Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Lao Tzu‘Silence is a source of great strength’ Lao Tzu

Laozi (also Lao-Tzu) was a philosopher and poet of ancient China. He is best known as the reputed author of the Tao Te Ching and the founder of philosophical Taoism, but he is also revered as a deity in religious Taoism and traditional Chinese religions. Although a legendary figure, he is usually dated to around the 6th century BC and reckoned a contemporary of Confucius, but some historians contend that he actually lived during the Warring States period of the 5th or 4th century BC. A central figure in Chinese culture, Laozi is claimed by both the emperors of the Tang dynasty and modern people of the Li surname as a founder of their lineage. Throughout history, Laozi’s work has been embraced by various anti-authoritarian movements. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Erica Jong

‘Advice is what we ask for when we already know the answer but wish we didn’t’ Erica Jong, How to Save Your Own Life, 1977

Erica Jong (née Mann; born March 26, 1942) is an American author and teacher best known for her fiction and poetry, and particularly for her 1973 novel Fear of Flying. The book became famously controversial for its attitudes towards female sexuality and figured prominently in the development of second-wave feminism. According to Washington Post, it has sold more than 20 million copies worldwide. (Source: Wikipedia)

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William Hazlitt

‘Prosperity is a great teacher; adversity is a greater’ William Hazlitt

William Hazlitt (10 April 1778 – 18 September 1830) was an English writer, remembered for his humanistic essays and literary criticism, as the greatest art critic of his age, and as a drama critic, social commentator, and philosopher. He was also a painter. He is now considered one of the great critics and essayists of the English language, placed in the company of Samuel Johnson and George Orwell. Yet his work is currently little read and mostly out of print. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Dorothy Parker

‘It’s not the tragedies that kill us, it’s the messes’ Dorothy Parker

Dorothy Parker (August 22, 1893 – June 7, 1967) was an American poet, short story writer, critic and satirist, best known for her wit, wisecracks, and eye for 20th-century urban foibles. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Confucious

‘Only the wisest and stupidest of men never change’ Confucius

Confucius (551–479 BC) was a Chinese teacher, editor, politician, and philosopher of the Spring and Autumn period of Chinese history. The philosophy of Confucius emphasized personal and governmental morality, correctness of social relationships, justice and sincerity. Confucius is traditionally credited with having authored or edited many of the Chinese classic texts including all of the Five Classics, but modern scholars are cautious of attributing specific assertions to Confucius himself. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Hosseini

‘When you tell a lie, you steal someone’s right to the truth’ Khaled Hosseini, The Kite Runner

Khaled Hosseini (born March 4, 1965) is an Afghan-born American novelist and physician. After graduating from college, he worked as a doctor in California, an occupation that he likened to “an arranged marriage”. He has published three novels, most notably his 2003 debut The Kite Runner, all of which are at least partially set in Afghanistan and feature an Afghan as the protagonist. Following the success of The Kite Runner he retired from medicine to write full-time. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Hermann Hesse

‘Some of us think holding on makes us strong; but sometimes it is letting go’ Hermann Hesse

Hermann Hesse (2 July 1877 – 9 August 1962) was a German born Swiss poet, novelist, and painter. His best-known works include Steppenwolf, Siddhartha, and The Glass Bead Game, each of which explores an individual’s search for authenticity, self-knowledge and spirituality. In 1946, he received the Nobel Prize in Literature. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Horace

‘Remember when life’s path is steep to keep your mind even’ Quintus Horatius Flaccus

Quintus Horatius Flaccus (December 8, 65 BC – November 27, 8 BC), known in the English-speaking world as Horace, was the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus (also known as Octavian). Quintillian regarded his Odes as just about the only Latin lyrics worth reading: “He can be lofty sometimes, yet he is also full of charm and grace, versatile in his figures, and felicitously daring in his choice of words.” (Source: Wikipedia)

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George Orwell

‘War is peace. Freedom is slavery. Ignorance is strength’ George Orwell, 1984

Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 – 21 January 1950), who used the pen name George Orwell, was an English novelist, essayist, journalist and critic. Commonly ranked as one of the most influential English writers of the 20th century, and as one of the most important chroniclers of English culture of his generation, Orwell wrote literary criticism, poetry, fiction, and polemical journalism. He is best known for the dystopian novel Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949) and the allegorical novella Animal Farm (1945). His book Homage to Catalonia (1938), an account of his experiences in the Spanish Civil War, is widely acclaimed, as are his numerous essays on politics, literature, language, and culture. In 2008, The Times ranked him second on a list of “The 50 greatest British writers since 1945″. (Source: Wikipedia)

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