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FAVOURITE QUOTES

MARK HAYSOM is the author of the critically acclaimed ‘Love, Love Me Do’ and ‘Imagine’. From time to time, he publishes favourite quotes from great writers, leaders and thinkers.

 

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Douglas Adams

douglas adams inspired "Hitch hikers guide to the galaxy" H2G2

‘Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so’

‘I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be’

Douglas Noel Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was an English writer, humorist, and dramatist. Adams is best known as the author of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, which originated in 1978 as a BBC radio comedy before developing into a “trilogy” of five books that sold more than 15 million copies in his lifetime and generated a television series, several stage plays, comics, a computer game, and in 2005 a feature film. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Aesop

Aesop

‘Please all, and you will please none’

Aesop (c. 620–564 BCE) was an Ancient Greek fabulist or story teller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as Aesop’s Fables. Although his existence remains uncertain and (if he ever existed) no writings by him survive, numerous tales credited to him were gathered across the centuries and in many languages in a storytelling tradition that continues to this day. Many of the tales are characterized by animals and inanimate objects that speak, solve problems, and generally have human characteristics. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Thomas Aquinas

Thomas Aquinas

‘There is nothing on this earth more to be prized than true friendship’

Thomas Aquinas, ( 1225 – 7 March 1274), also Thomas of Aquin or Aquino, was an Italian Dominican friar and Catholic priest who was an immensely influential philosopher and theologian in the tradition of scholasticism, within which he is also known as the “Doctor Angelicus” and “Doctor Communis”. “Aquinas” is from the county of Aquino, an area where his family held land until 1137. He was born in Roccasecca, Italy. (Source:Wikipedia)

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Isaac Asimov

Isaac Asimov

‘Life is pleasant. Death is peaceful. It’s the transition that’s troublesome.

Isaac Asimov (born Isaak Yudovich Ozimov; circa January 2, 1920 – April 6, 1992) was an American author and professor of biochemistry at Boston University, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. Asimov was prolific and wrote or edited more than 500 books and an estimated 90,000 letters and postcards. Asimov is widely considered a master of hard science fiction and, along with Robert A. Heinlein and Arthur C. Clarke, he was considered one of the “Big Three” science fiction writers during his lifetime. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Clement Atlee

Attlee

‘Democracy means government by discussion, but it is only effective if you can stop people talking’

Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee, (3 January 1883 – 8 October 1967) was a British politician who was the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1945 to 1951 and the Leader of the Labour Party from 1935 to 1955. Attlee was the first person to hold the office of Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, serving under Winston Churchill in the wartime coalition government, before going on to lead the Labour Party to a landslide election victory in 1945 and a narrow victory in 1950. He became the first Labour Prime Minister ever to serve a full five-year term, as well as the first to command a Labour majority in Parliament, and remains the longest-ever serving Leader of the Labour Party. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Marcus Aurelius

Marcus Aurelius

‘How much more grievous are the consequences of anger than the causes of it’

Marcus Aurelius (26 April 121 – 17 March 180 AD) was Roman Emperor from 161 to 180. He ruled with Lucius Verus as co-emperor from 161 until Verus’ death in 169. He was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. His Meditations is still revered as a literary monument to a philosophy of service and duty, describing how to find and preserve equanimity in the midst of conflict by following nature as a source of guidance and inspiration. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Jane Austen

Jane Austen

‘Perhaps it is our imperfections that make us so perfect for one another’

Jane Austen (16 December 1775 – 18 July 1817) was an English novelist whose works of romantic fiction, set among the landed gentry, earned her a place as one of the most widely read writers in English literature. Her realism, biting irony and social commentary as well as her acclaimed plots have gained her historical importance among scholars and critics. Austen lived her entire life as part of a close-knit family located on the lower fringes of the English landed gentry. She was educated primarily by her father and older brothers as well as through her own reading. From her teenage years into her thirties she experimented with various literary forms, including an epistolary novel which she then abandoned, wrote and extensively revised three major novels and began a fourth. From 1811 until 1816, with the release of Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814) and Emma (1815), she achieved success as a published writer. She wrote two additional novels, Northanger Abbey and Persuasion, both published posthumously in 1818, and began a third, which was eventually titled Sanditon, but died before completing it. (Source: Wikipedia)

 

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James Baldwin

James Baldwin

‘Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced’

James Arthur Baldwin (August 2, 1924 – December 1, 1987) was an American novelist, essayist, playwright, poet, and social critic. Baldwin’s novels and plays fictionalize fundamental personal questions and dilemmas amid complex social and psychological pressures thwarting the equitable integration of not only blacks, but also of gay and bisexual men. Baldwin’s first novel, Go Tell It on the Mountain, is his best-known work. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Honoré de Balzac

HBalzac‘Behind every great fortune there is a crime’

Honoré de Balzac (20 May 1799 – 18 August 1850) was a French novelist and playwright. His magnum opus was a sequence of short stories and novels collectively entitled La Comédie Humaine, which presents a panorama of French life in the years after the 1815 Fall of Napoleon Bonaparte. (Source: Wikipedia)

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James M. Barrie

James Matthew Barrie

‘Life is a long lesson in humility’

Sir James Matthew Barrie, 1st Baronet, OM (9 May 1860 – 19 June 1937) was a Scottish author and dramatist, best remembered today as the creator of Peter Pan. The child of a family of small-town weavers, he was educated in Scotland. He moved to London, where he developed a career as a novelist and playwright. There he met the Llewelyn Davies boys who inspired him in writing about a baby boy who has magical adventures in Kensington Gardens (included in The Little White Bird), then to write Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up, a “fairy play” about this ageless boy and an ordinary girl named Wendy who have adventures in the fantasy setting of Neverland. Barrie unofficially adopted the Davies boys following the deaths of their parents. (source: Wikipedia)

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Simone de Beauvoir

Simone De Beauvoir

‘Change your life today. Don’t gamble on the future, act now, without delay’

Simone Lucie Ernestine Marie Bertrand de Beauvoir, commonly known as Simone de Beauvoir (9 January 1908 – 14 April 1986), was a French writer, intellectual, existentialist philosopher, political activist, feminist and social theorist. Though she did not consider herself a philosopher, she had a significant influence on both feminist existentialism and feminist theory. De Beauvoir wrote novels, essays, biographies, autobiography and monographs on philosophy, politics and social issues. She is known for her 1949 treatise The Second Sex, a detailed analysis of women’s oppression and a foundational tract of contemporary feminism; her novels, including She Came to Stay and The Mandarins; and her lifelong relationship with Jean-Paul Sartre. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Samuel Beckett

Samuel Beckett

‘Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better.’

Samuel Barclay Beckett (13 April 1906 – 22 December 1989) was an Irish avant-garde novelist, playwright, theatre director, and poet, who lived in Paris for most of his adult life and wrote in both English and French. His work offers a bleak, tragicomic outlook on human nature, often coupled with black comedy and gallows humour. He is one of the key writers in what Martin Esslin called the “Theatre of the Absurd”. His work became increasingly minimalist in his later career. Beckett was awarded the 1969 Nobel Prize in Literature. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Henry Ward Beecher

Henry Ward Beecher

‘Do not be afraid of defeat. you are never so near victory as when defeated in a good cause’

‘Hold yourself responsible for a higher standard than anybody expects of you. Never excuse yourself.’

Henry Ward Beecher (June 24, 1813 – March 8, 1887) was an American Congregationalist clergyman, social reformer, and speaker, known for his support of the abolition of slavery, his emphasis on God’s love, and his 1875 adultery trial. Henry Ward Beecher was the son of Lyman Beecher, a Calvinist minister who became one of the best-known evangelists of his age. Several of his brothers and sisters became well-known educators and activists, most notably Harriet Beecher Stowe, who achieved worldwide fame with her abolitionist novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Arnold Bennett

Arnold Bennett

‘Having once decided to achieve a certain task, achieve it at all costs of tedium and distaste. The gain in self-confidence of having accomplished a tiresome labour is immense.’

Enoch Arnold Bennett (27 May 1867 – 27 March 1931) was an English writer. He is best known as a novelist, but he also worked in other fields such as journalism, propaganda and film. In 1902, Anna of the Five Towns, the first of a succession of stories which detailed life in the Potteries, appeared. His most famous works are the Clayhanger trilogy and The Old Wives’ Tale. These books draw on his experience of life in the Potteries, as did most of his best work. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Bertolt Brecht

Bertolt-Brecht

‘Do not fear death so much, but rather the inadequate life’

Bertolt Brecht (born Eugen Berthold Friedrich Brecht; 10 February 1898 – 14 August 1956) was a German poet, playwright, and theatre director of the 20th century. He made contributions to dramaturgy and theatrical production, the latter through the tours undertaken by the Berliner Ensemble – the post-war theatre company operated by Brecht and his wife, long-time collaborator and actress Helene Weigel. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Charlotte Bronte

Charlotte Bronte

‘Life appears to me too short to be spent in nursing animosity, or registering wrongs’

Charlotte Brontë (21 April 1816 – 31 March 1855) was an English novelist and poet, the eldest of the three Brontë sisters who survived into adulthood and whose novels have become classics of English literature. She first published her works (including her best known novel, Jane Eyre) under the pen name Currer Bell. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Edmund Burke

NPG 655; Edmund Burke studio of Sir Joshua Reynolds

‘All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing’

‘The greater the power, the more dangerous the abuse’

‘To read without reflecting is like eating without digesting’

Edmund Burke (12 January 1729[ – 9 July 1797) was an Irish statesman born in Dublin; author, orator, political theorist, and philosopher, who, after moving to England, served for many years in the House of Commons of Great Britain as a member of the Whig party. (Source: Wikipedia)

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John Burroughs

John Burroughs 1909

‘The lure of the distant and the difficult is deceptive. The great opportunity is where you are.’

‘The smallest deed is better than the greatest intention’

John Burroughs (April 3, 1837 – March 29, 1921) was an American naturalist and nature essayist, active in the U.S. conservation movement. The first of his essay collections was Wake-Robin in 1871. In the words of his biographer Edward Renehan, Burroughs’ special identity was less that of a scientific naturalist than that of “a literary naturalist with a duty to record his own unique perceptions of the natural world.” The result was a body of work whose resonance with the tone of its cultural moment explains both its popularity at that time, and its relative obscurity since. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Samuel Butler

Samuel Butler

‘Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.’

‘Life is like playing a violin in public and learning the instrument as one goes on’

Samuel Butler (4 December 1835 – 18 June 1902) was an iconoclastic Victorian-era English author who published a variety of works. Two of his most famous pieces are the Utopian satire Erewhon and a semi-autobiographical novel published posthumously, The Way of All Flesh. He is also known for examining Christian orthodoxy, substantive studies of evolutionary thought, studies of Italian art, and works of literary history and criticism. Butler made prose translations of the Iliad and Odyssey, which remain in use to this day.(Source: Wikipedia)

 

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